+91 8617752708

International Journal of Biochemistry Research & Review, ISSN: 2231-086X,Vol.: 20, Issue.: 4

Short Communication

Evaluation of High Levels of Triglycerides in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

 

D. Santha Rao1*, V. Praveena1 and Bhukya Veeranna1

1ESIC Medical College, Sanathnagar, Hyderabad, India.

Article Information
Editor(s):
(1) Enrico Sanjust, Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medical Sciences, University of Cagliari, Italy.
Reviewers:
(1) Dhastagir Sheriff, Benghazi University, Libya.
(2) Elvira Bormusov, Technion Institute of Technology, Israel.
Complete Peer review History: http://www.sciencedomain.org/review-history/23151

Abstracts

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is starting as accumulation of fat in the hepatocytes (steatosis) which is a sub-clinical condition in those who are not consuming alcohol. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a condition of steatosis, associated with inflammation of liver cell.  This is a clinical form of NAFLD, which is regarded as a major cause of cirrhosis of the liver [1]. This distinction between simple steatosis and NASH is important because the natural history of these categories differs substantially. Patients with simple steatosis usually have a benign prognosis from the point of view of liver disease [2-5]. In contrast, up to 20% of patients with NASH may ultimately develop advanced liver disease [2,4-6]. The prognosis of NASH-related cirrhosis is poor: It results in liver failure or liver-related death in approximately one third of cases [7,8]. Hepatocellular cancer is also a recently recognized complication of NASH-related cirrhosis [7,9].

Keywords :

Non- alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD); Non alcoholic steatohepatitis(NASH); cirrhosis; liver failure; Hepatocellular cancer; advanced liver disease.

Full Article - PDF    Page 1-5 Article Metrics

DOI : 10.9734/IJBCRR/2017/33499

Review History    Comments

Our Contacts

Guest House Road, Street no - 1/6,
Hooghly, West Bengal,
India

+91 8617752708

 

Third Floor, 207 Regent Street
London, W1B 3HH,
UK

+44 20-3031-1429